Expats in Canada and Dual Citizens: Your Information May Have been Directly Transmitted to the IRS

Expats in Canada and Dual Citizens: Your Information May Have been Directly Transmitted to the IRS

Many American expatriates living in Canada are keenly aware of their obligation to file a Report of Foreign Bank Account (FBAR) and Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). However, some expats can lose sight of this obligation. Other taxpayers may be less aware of their need to file reports of foreign accounts. For instance, an “accidental American” is a Canadian citizen who unwittingly obtained citizenship from a parent at birth or through other means. These individuals may not even be aware that they are a United States Citizen — nevermind that they could have an obligation to file offshore disclosure reports. In at least some situations, this can lead to taxpayers facing enormous fines and other potential consequences. If you are an expat, a dual citizen, or a taxpayer who is otherwise concerned about potential U.S. tax or foreign disclosure obligations, Ted Kleinman of U.S. Tax Help may be able to assist. For decades, Ted has helped expats, dual citizens, and others with U.S. tax obligations for decades. To schedule a free consultation, please call Ted at (541) 923-0903 or contact U.S. Tax Help online. Canada Is a FATCA Signatory and Reports Tax Information to the United States In 2010, FATCA was passed by Congress in an attempt to crack down on perceived income tax evasion by wealthy Americans. This law was put into effect through the signing of an intergovernmental agreement between the United States government and more than 100 other governments. The IGA between the United States and Canada went into effect in 2014. Under the Model 1 agreement the nations signed, tax information is sent to...
U.S. Expat Tax Alert:  IRS Private Debt Collectors to Begin Collection Attempts

U.S. Expat Tax Alert: IRS Private Debt Collectors to Begin Collection Attempts

U.S. expatriates living in foreign nations generally understand that their lack of physical presence does not excuse them from U.S. tax filing and payment obligations. In fact, absent certain provisions found in tax treaties, expats would face a more significant tax burden as they would face both local and U.S.-based taxation. For some taxpayers living abroad who may not be aware of methods to reduce or eliminate double-taxation, this can mean that large tax bills build up over time. These tax bills may be old and the IRS may have even given up on collecting them. However, these tax debts, which are due and owing, may spring back to the minds of U.S. taxpayers throughout the world as private debt collectors begin to make their collection attempts. U.S. taxpayers living abroad may be surprised to receive calls from debt collectors. CPA Ted Kleinman and U.S. Tax Help can provide the guidance expats need to avoid potential tax scams while navigating the new tax challenges presented by private IRS debt collectors. To schedule a no-cost consultation, call Ted at U.S. Tax Help at (541) 923-0903. What Should I Do if I am Called by a Private Debt Collector Over Tax Debts? Until recently, tax practitioners could safely advise clients and potential clients that the IRS would never call them or seek payment of outstanding debts over a phone call. Despite this clear-cut advice, fraudsters tricked American taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars. The use of private debt collectors who can and will call taxpayers will only serve to introduce additional confusion and uncertainty while increasing the likelihood that...
Is it Possible to File a Joint FBAR?

Is it Possible to File a Joint FBAR?

Taxpayers are generally aware that certain tax obligations can be filed jointly. That is, a married couple can file a single tax return that satisfies each taxpayers’ obligation to file and pay taxes. However, a joint tax return is most commonly discussed in the context of a taxpayer’s income tax return. While income tax is often the main obligation that taxpayers face, it is far from the only informational reporting duty. In fact, in recent years, Congress has enacted new obligations requiring foreign disclosures or introduced new penalties to further compel compliance with already existing foreign disclosure obligations. In particular, taxpayers are frequently concerned with their potential duty to file FBAR. Concern over FBAR is justified because even inadvertent mistakes can result in large fines and unwanted scrutiny. If you have questions about whether you are required to file FBAR, Ted Kleinman and U.S. Tax Help may be able to assist. Likewise, if you are considering whether a joint FBAR filing may be appropriate, Ted can provide on-point guidance. To schedule a free consultation, call CPA Ted Kleinman at U.S. Tax Help by dialing (541) 923-0903 today. When Is a Taxpayer Permitted to File a Joint Tax Return? Taxpayers are generally aware that they are able to file a joint tax return under certain circumstances. While state law impacts exactly who can file a joint tax return, the general rule is that only two married individuals are permitted to file taxes jointly. Whether you are considered married for tax filing purposes is based on your state’s laws. Generally, any couple who is recognized as married under their state’s laws...
U.S. Expats Beware:  The Tax Filing Deadline for the 2017 Filing Season is Quickly Approaching

U.S. Expats Beware: The Tax Filing Deadline for the 2017 Filing Season is Quickly Approaching

For expatriates living in nations like Brazil, China, the U.K., or Saudi Arabia tax time can quickly sneak up on a taxpayer. When you are living outside of the American media bubble, it can be easy to become immersed in the culture that surrounds you and to pay less attention to U.S.-based events and obligations. As far as taxes go, this level of cultural immersion is often a problem as expats can find themselves scrambling to make a timely filing at the last minute or miss the filing deadline entirely. If you are an expat and have not yet considered your 2016 taxes which will be filed during the 2017 filing season, the time to do so is now. While you have more time to file than a taxpayer living in the United States, the taxes of expats are frequently more complex and require more time. Expatriates may need to consider tax treaty provisions to minimize the impacts of double-taxation. U.S. taxpayers living abroad are also more likely to need to make offshore account disclosures through FBAR or FATCA. Deadlines for Expats Filing U.S. Tax Returns Most expats are aware that, provided they satisfy certain tests, as a foreign resident they automatically have additional time to file taxes. Taxpayers who qualify as foreign residents automatically have until June 15, 2017 to file their taxes. Furthermore, an additional six-month extension can be requested pushing the tax filing deadline to October 16, 2017. Taxpayers who require an additional six-month extension can request it by filing IRS Form 4868. However, it is important to note that the extension of time to file...
What Can Happen if a Taxpayer Fails to File Taxes?

What Can Happen if a Taxpayer Fails to File Taxes?

While CPAs, accountants, and tax professionals frequently warn taxpayers regarding the parade of horribles that can occur if a taxpayer falls out of compliance with the U.S. Tax Code. Despite these warnings, taxpayers still fail to file taxes for an array of reasons. Some taxpayer – particularly expatriates – may fail to file their income taxes because they do not realize they have an obligation to report all income inclusive of foreign income. Other taxpayers may fail to file because they become overwhelmed with the complexity of their tax filing. Still others may fail to file taxes simply because they do not think the IRS will notice their non-filing. If you stopped filing taxes because you didn’t know where to start or made good faith mistakes regarding your filing obligation, U.S. tax accountant and CPA Ted Kleinman may be able to help. At U.S. Tax Help Ted is proud to assist taxpayers living in the United States and abroad. To schedule a no-cost consultation, call U.S. Tax Help at (541) 923-0903 or contact Ted online. Also, please see our information on important 2017 dates for American expatriates. How Does the IRS Detect Tax Non-Filers? As mentioned above, at least some taxpayers do not file taxes because they believe the likelihood of facing an enforcement action is remote. Other taxpayers may simply decide to abandon their compliance efforts when they believe that enforcement is unlikely and they are facing a complex and confusing tax issue. Unfortunately, for taxpayers who engage in this type of action, the IRS has developed multiple systems to catch tax non-filers. In fact, a failure to file...
IRA Rollover Problems? Is the IRS seeking a Penalty? New Rules May Provide Tax Relief

IRA Rollover Problems? Is the IRS seeking a Penalty? New Rules May Provide Tax Relief

Today, a ever-increasing share of responsibility for retirement planning and retirement savings is placed on the individual rather than pension plan administrators and other professionals. Reasons behind this shift include business’s desire to reduce costs, a do-it-yourself national ethos, and the rise of investment vehicles like the 401(k). While many taxpayers successfully navigate the often complex rules that govern IRAs and other retirement accounts, it is not outside the realm of possibility to make serious tax mistakes regarding these retirement accounts and disbursements you may receive. If you have received an IRA rollover disbursement and failed to reinvest that money in a qualifying account in a timely manner, you may be subject to significant penalties. Working with careful tax lawyers can help taxpayers avoid a situation of this type. However, if you fear that you have already made an error, Ted Kleinman of U.S. Tax Help may be able to utilize new IRS rules to mitigate the tax consequences of the this mistake. To schedule a free consultation, call Ted at (541) 923-0903 or online today. What Happens If I Fail to Deposit an IRA Rollover Within 60 Days? When it comes to distributions from an IRA or IRA rollovers, the IRS applies what is known as the 60-day Rule. Under the 60-day Rule, a taxpayer is afforded 60 days to redeposit or reinvest the account in a qualifying account. If the taxpayer fails to redeposit the funds within this timeframe, significant penalties can apply. After 60 days elapses without appropriate action, the IRS assumes that you have had use of the money. This determination means that income tax...