Check your IRS Refund Status from Anywhere using your Mobile Device (click here)

Check your IRS Refund Status from Anywhere using your Mobile Device (click here)

Check the Status of your Refund with the IRS App These days there’s an app for everything including the IRS. Download the IRS app IRS2go on your mobile device from either Amazon, the Apple App Store, or Google Play, to quickly and easily do many things that would have taken more time and effort in the past. Read on to find out what you can do on the IRS2go app. Check the Status of your Refund In the past, tax payers had to either call the IRS or access the web-page from a computer to check on the status of a refund. With IRS2go you can quickly check the status of a refund right from your mobile device. You will need your SSN or ITIN, your filing status and the exact amount of your refund. Refund status is typically available either 24 hours after e-filing your return or 4 weeks after you mailed your return. The IRS updates daily, usually overnight. Make a Payment to the IRS Making a payment to the IRS is simple with the IRS2go app. Using the app, you can make a payment to the IRS by credit card, debit or Direct Pay. You can also pay when you e-file or schedule a payment with Direct Pay. Access Free Tax Help With the IRS2go app you can access free tax help, including a link to IRS Free File to see if you are eligible. There’s a link to a Free Tax Prep Site Locator. Simply enter your zip-code to view a list of volunteer sites available to help people who make $54,000 or less, speak...
Shipping Household Items Overseas (click here)

Shipping Household Items Overseas (click here)

Relocating within the US for a job can be challenging enough. Relocating to another country adds a whole new set of stressors. Some may be looking for a new job, while others are moving to advance in a career they already have. While living abroad for work can present amazing opportunities to check things off your personal bucket list, learn about new cultures, and broaden your network, it also comes with a long list of challenges. Shipping your household items overseas is one of those challenges. Requirements for Shipping Household Items Overseas Researching housing, schools, and neighborhoods in the country where you will be moving is sure to be top on your list. In addition, securing visas and work permits, opening bank accounts and getting your financial and tax situations secured are also necessary. With all of this said, there is one very important thing that needs to be done correctly before you can even embark on the above-mentioned list. How will you go about shipping your household items overseas to your new dwelling place? The IRS has strict rules for this process as well and it’s best to do it right. Beginning in 2009, the Foreign Trade Division of the US Census Bureau required all US Citizens who are shipping household goods and personal items overseas to obtain an EIN (Employee Identification Number) before shipment will be permitted to be exported from the US. While the task of obtaining an EIN may sound daunting, it is simple to do and it’s free. Directions for Obtaining an EIN You must have an SNN or ITIN to obtain an EIN....
When Should an Expatriate Fix Unfiled Back Taxes and other Mistakes?

When Should an Expatriate Fix Unfiled Back Taxes and other Mistakes?

There are many reasons why a person can fall behind on their tax filings. For expatriates living outside of the United States, in nations like Hong Kong or China maintaining compliance with tax laws and foreign disclosure obligations can be significantly more difficult. Part of the reason for this fact is simply practical in nature. That is, individuals who are living outside of the United States are removed from many reminders of daily life and obligations. They are less likely to see reminders about the tax filing deadline on T.V., in the newspaper, or in other media. As such, it can be incredibly easy to fall behind on tax obligations without ever intending to do so. At U.S. Tax Help, CPA Ted Kleinman has assisted taxpayers living abroad for more than 20 years. Ted can assist with catching up on missed past filings, correcting tax mistakes, or handling all aspects of your tax compliance going forward. To discuss how Ted can help you fix your tax mistakes, please call (541) 923-0903. Scenario #1:  You Have Experienced a Windfall If you have made investments and experience a windfall due to savvy decision-making, you may wish to cash out and deposit the proceeds in your bank account. However, taking these steps can trigger unwanted scrutiny from the IRS or state tax agencies. This is because when a taxpayer makes a large deposit to his or her bank account, there is always a chance or inevitability that the bank will report the transaction. For cash transactions greater than $10,000, the bank has a duty to report. If you break these transactions into...
Can a Taxpayer Trust the Information He or She Obtains Through the IRS?

Can a Taxpayer Trust the Information He or She Obtains Through the IRS?

In the United States, it seems that most approaches to customer service are generally based on common sense. That is, if you have a problem with a company or with the government you contact the appropriate office to express your concerns or to obtain information. At first glance, the approach the IRS takes to providing tax information and tax guidance is no different. Unfortunately, a little bit of digging by an interested taxpayer would show that appearances are deceiving and taxpayers must carefully consider any tax advice or guidance they receive from the IRS whether the advice is obtained online or over the phone. If you have tax questions, it is wise to work with an experienced tax practitioner. CPA Ted Kleinman has worked with expats on an array of tax concerns, routine tax filings, and tax problems for more than 20 years. To discuss how Ted can help you understand, assess, and weigh information provided by the IRS so that you can comply with all tax obligations while legally minimizing your obligations, call 1-800-810-9132 today. Can You Trust What the IRS Publishes on IRS.com? While the IRS does its best to ensure that all information posted on its site is accurate and up-to-date, no efforts can ensure perfection. In recognition of this fact, the IRS specifically disclaims liability for taxpayer use of certain materials on its website. These distinctions are set forth, at length, in a recent May 18, 2017, memo issued by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. While the target audience for the memo was IRS auditors and examiners, the memo is also instructive to taxpayers...
How Should an Expatriate Approach a Tax Letter from the IRS?

How Should an Expatriate Approach a Tax Letter from the IRS?

Taxpayers living abroad may face additional difficulties and inconveniences when they file their taxes. They may experience difficulties receiving correspondence and tax documents such as W-2s and 1099s. Other taxpayers living abroad may have real questions about how provisions in tax treaties impact their taxes and allow them to reduce the potential impact of double-taxation. Needless to say, the taxes of an expat living abroad can be far more complex than the taxes of a person living at home. Thus, there is a greater chance that an expat may receive a letter or other notice from the IRS regarding potential problems with one’s taxes. While you may believe that you have taken all steps necessary to protect against a letter from the IRS, the tax agency can send these letters for many reasons. In fact, some letters are merely informational and do not require any action on the part of the taxpayer. However, other notices may alert taxpayers to potentially serious issues that require immediate attention. Working with a tax professional such as Ted Kleinman at U.S. Tax Help can assist a tax payer in getting a handle on the situation they face. Ted can help an expat taxpayer understand what the IRS is asking about along with potential means to address it. To schedule a free “no cost” initial review, please call U.S. Tax Help at (541) 923-0903. Take a Deep Breath and Avoid Potentially Undue Alarm When a taxpayer sees the letters I-R-S on a letter, their first instinct is often to panic. They may have already heard about the huge potential fines that can accompany an...
Can Streamlined Disclosure Really Eliminate Offshore and FBAR Penalties?

Can Streamlined Disclosure Really Eliminate Offshore and FBAR Penalties?

Since at least 2010, taxpayers living in the United States and in foreign nations have heard one steady message regarding foreign bank and financial accounts: disclose or face penalties and potential prosecution. Unfortunately, not all taxpayers have received this message. At least some taxpayers still seem to believe that the rules do not apply to them or do not reach them. Therefore, there is no reason for them to consider their compliance status. Such an approach to FBAR and foreign account disclosure obligations is dangerous and becoming even riskier. In light of an array of reporting requirements faced by foreign nations and foreign financial institutions, U.S. taxpayers can no longer rely on their account remaining secret from the IRS or other government regulators. Taxpayers who fail to comply with FBAR will continue to face an elevated risk of discovery as additional international governmental agreements authorizing tax and financial information sharing come into effect. When Do I Need to Make an FBAR Disclosure? The obligation to file a Report of a Foreign Bank Account (FBAR) is a longstanding obligation that has been on the books for decades. However, until recently, the obligation was rarely enforced because there was no penalty for noncompliance. However, in the late-2000s, a penalty was implemented. In fact, very serious penalties were implemented for all forms of FBAR noncompliance. Even a person who accidentally fails to file FBAR can face a penalty of up to $10,000 for each year where noncompliance existed. Generally, the obligation to file FBAR exists when a U.S. taxpayer holds foreign accounts containing more than $10,000. The funds can be held in...